Posts tagged ‘music’

November 29, 2012

Cybernetic music

by Nathaniel Virgo

Is it okay to post art on a science blog? Well this is kind of science, so I guess it’s kind of okay.

Here is a litte piece of computer-generated music that I created yesterday:

As Twitter user @DanieleTatti noted, it sounds like a sort of Scottish raga. But what I wanted to post about was the algorithm used to generate that ever changing sequence of pitches and warbles. It’s quite a simple idea – simple enough in fact that the whole piece is generated by the following 140 characters of SuperCollider code:

play{ar(r=RLPF,Saw.ar([200,302]).mean,5**(n={LFNoise1.kr(1/8)})*1e3,0.6)
+r.ar(Saw ar:Amplitude.kr(3**n*3e3*InFeedback.ar(0)+1,4,4),1e3)/5!2}

December 23, 2011

Jelly Christmas 1: The N days of Christmas

by Lucas Wilkins

The song, Twelve days of Christmas raises a number of important questions, like who gives milkmaids as presents? and will this song ever end? But most importantly, it makes us ask: If every day was a day of Christmas (like some may wish), would it still be physically possible to sing the song?

Here’s how long it took to sing each verse on the John Peel show one year when the great man was still alive:

June 7, 2011

Where music and art meets science

by Joshaniel Cooper

The length of the largest cartesian dimension of an average animal named by the theme as a function of the duration of its theme

As a scientist it is important to check that the old composers didn’t try to hide messages in the statistics of their songs. Camille Saint-Saëns is off the hook so far but tests continue. Kudos if you can identify each point’s animal.

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